blueollie

Winning will be tough for liberals …

I really don’t care much about award shows, but at the Grammy awards, Hillary Clinton made a cameo appearance (via video) and read a tiny bit from Fire and Fury and, well, poked fun at Trump’s lack of intellectualism (noted that other presidents and politicians have won Grammy awards for reading). Well, some liberals…actually took exception:

The whole premise was, of course, cooked up to give the show an excuse to display its TDS (Trump Derangement Syndrome). It’s bad enough that there’s a gratuitous slur at Trump at the Grammys, one that had nothing to do with music, but when his opponent in the election reads about his predilection for McDonald’s burgers, well, it’s not only not funny, but it’s unseemly. And it surely won’t make middle America like the Democratic Party any better. Perhaps the advance word that the show would be politicized accounts in part for the huge drop in viewership compared to last year.

Now, yeah, I found it a bit unseemly too, but…really…SO. FUCKING. WHAT. Trump has never hesitated to sling insults at private citizens. And who gives a damn what Trump supporters would think? They are utterly unreachable; trying to talk to them would be like giving a science argument to a Bible beater. There is an outside chance that we can flip just enough of the “I didn’t like Trump but I absolutely LOATHED Hillary” voters.

But there you have it…liberals criticizing liberals for taking the low road (in a benign way). When have you seen Republicans do that to other Republicans?

Or..let some liberal make fun of Sarah Sanders or Kellyanne Conway in the “wrong way” and some SJW will ride in to attack you for your “misogyny”.

Even worse: our very mindset of taking up for the perceived underdog is not politically popular. Liberals vocally support: the poor, the homeless, the mentally ill, the Dreamers, rights for illegal aliens…the rights for ex felons to vote, rights for transgirls to shower with genetic girls, etc. And any semblance of a discussion will be met with “oh, you are just a bigot” or “that is just bigotry”, blah, blah, blah.

Oh well…..

And speaking of bleeding heart causes: some advocates are pushing for …pet food to be covered by food stamps!

Now ..hear me out..there are times when a pet can lead to increased emotional and mental health..and the pet might be cheaper than other therapies. So that being covered by services for the indigent might not be a bad idea..but I think that the funding ought to come from another pot (Medicaid? “Paws for the poor”(ok, I just made that up))

Sexual harassment: This is an interesting article about how, at times, the harassed may well have, on some level, “enjoyed” the harassment, which is still improper. This is in the context of a yoga class ..and let me be perfectly clear: this applies to NO ONE that I’ve ever taken yoga from.

Had the notorious “Yoga Sex Scandal” (as it was called by the New York Times) gone down six months ago, I might have jumped on the shock-and-horror bandwagon with nearly everyone else in the blogosphere. But as a new transplant to Santa Monica (a city I often refer to as 2nd chakra central), I was hardly surprised. At the very first class I took in L.A., a male teacher unexpectedly caressed—OK, more like groped— my ass in Downward Dog. There I was, minding my own ujjayi breath, when suddenly I felt a hand sliding over my spandex covered thigh.

At first I was shocked. He was supposed to be a professional, and here he was caressing my butt cheek in a public yoga class. But as he walked away, I felt my hips involuntarily sway back a little bit, almost as if silently asking for more. I felt a flutter in the pit of my stomach, my cheeks flushing red hot. My mind couldn’t believe the way my body was responding … had I actually enjoyed that?

[…]

But another part of me—and this is something I feel a bit embarrassed to admit—knew that I hadn’t spoken up because, well, because it felt good. Something in me had enjoyed the touch, relished in the intimacy of a tender caress. It had felt tantalizing, almost intoxicating to be the object of that teacher’s affection. I felt wanted, desired, and, counterintuitive as it may seem, it made me feel powerful.

Workout notes:

usual PT, pull ups (5 sets of 10..good), bench press: 10 x 135, 6 x 185, 8 x 175, incline: 10 x 135, military: 10 x 50 dumbbell standing, 10 x 50 dumbbell standing (ugly), 10 x 180 machine, rows: 2 sets of 10 x 50 each arm, 10 x 110 machine. 25 twist crunch (each side, 50 total), moving bridge (2 sets of 10), 10 yoga leg lifts, headstand, side plank, 2 minute plank (hover),

treadmill: (some heel pain, left heel..at first) warm up with 11:30 mile, then 8:46 mile (6.7, .8, .9 7.0 every .25 miles). 20:15 total.

The second mile wasn’t as horrible as I feared it would be.

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January 30, 2018 Posted by | Democrats, political/social, politics/social, running, walking, yoga | | Leave a comment

Not encouraged (politics)

Wow..we are at the point where a remark about how insane it is to make AR-15s available to civilians was enough to get someone’s nomination withdrawn?

ean L. Winslow, a retired Air Force colonel and flight surgeon, is a professor of medicine at Stanford University.

Last week, I withdrew my name from consideration to be assistant secretary of defense for health affairs. My appointment had been put on indefinite hold by the Senate Armed Services Committee, and I felt the Defense Department needed to fill the position without undue delay. Our soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines deserve the full complement of Pentagon appointees to support them.
[…]

At my hearing, jet-lagged and in mourning over those killed, I was asked by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) about the military discharge status of the shooter. He had been given a bad-conduct rather than dishonorable discharge and — despite episodes of domestic violence and a stint in a psychiatric hospital — was able to buy several weapons, including an AR-15-style gun. Although I stated that discharge status was not my area of responsibility, Shaheen pressed her point. I acknowledged that the Air Force dropped the ball and recommended an inspector general’s investigation focusing on systems failures that contributed to the tragedy.

Then, I blurted out what was in my heart: “I’d also like to . . . just say how insane it is that in the United States of America a civilian can go out and buy a semiautomatic weapon like an AR-15.” Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) interrupted, warning this was not in my “area of responsibility or expertise.” Soon after, my confirmation was put on hold.

Age discrimination: Does the practice of targeting job ads toward a certain age group constitute age discrimination?

A few weeks ago, Verizon placed an ad on Facebook to recruit applicants for a unit focused on financial planning and analysis. The ad showed a smiling, millennial-aged woman seated at a computer and promised that new hires could look forward to a rewarding career in which they would be “more than just a number.”

Some relevant numbers were not immediately evident. The promotion was set to run on the Facebook feeds of users 25 to 36 years old who lived in the nation’s capital, or had recently visited there, and had demonstrated an interest in finance. For a vast majority of the hundreds of millions of people who check Facebook every day, the ad did not exist.

Verizon is among dozens of the nation’s leading employers — including Amazon, Goldman Sachs, Target and Facebook itself — that placed recruitment ads limited to particular age groups, an investigation by ProPublica and The New York Times has found.

Depressing news: sometimes, an honest discussion about serious issues is impossible:

Matt Damon gave an interview to ABC News last week in which he offered the following observation: “There’s a difference between, you know, patting someone on the butt and rape or child molestation, right? Both of those behaviors need to be confronted and eradicated without question, but they shouldn’t be conflated, right?”

Crazy, right?

Minnie Driver, Damon’s co-star in “Good Will Hunting,” thought so. “There is no hierarchy of abuse — that if a woman is raped [it] is much worse than if a woman has a penis exposed to her that she didn’t want or ask for,” she told The Guardian. “You cannot tell those women that one is supposed to feel worse than the other.”

Kirsten Gillibrand agrees: “I think when we start having to talk about the differences between sexual assault and sexual harassment and unwanted groping, you are having the wrong conversation,” the Democratic senator from New York said at a news conference when asked about calling on Senator Al Franken to resign. “You need to draw a line in the sand and say none of it is O.K. None of it is acceptable.”

Of course none of it is O.K. The supposedly petty sexual harassment that so many women have to endure, from Hollywood studios to the factory floor at Ford, is a national outrage that needs to end. Period.

But what about the idea that we should not even discuss the difference between verbal harassment, physical groping and rape? Here’s a guess: A vast majority of Americans, men and women, would agree with Damon’s comment in its entirety.

Oh boy. I sure hope Gillibrand isn’t going to run for national office. I can see why Trump attempted to bait her.

workout notes: 22:30 treadmill run (couldn’t get into it) then 4 mile Bradley Park walk (to top of Cornstalk hill and back)

December 22, 2017 Posted by | political/social, politics, running, social/political, walking | | Leave a comment

Sexual harassment: accusations can be both false and honest at the same time

Sexual harassment has been in the headlines quite a bit lately. This came up last night at a community yoga class. I was the only one who showed up so I got a “boutique” class with the teacher tailoring the class for me and giving me “hands on” adjustments (disclaimer: the teacher and I have been friends for well over a decade and have done things together..bike rides, yoga classes, hikes/runs, shared meals, etc.)

After one adjustment she joked “I sure hope that you don’t get me for sexual harassment” and I just chuckled. The “touch” adjustments work well for me; when these happen and when I do the poses on my own, I can then “feel” when I am out of position.

This took me back to my early days (25 years ago or so) at my place of employment.

There was a group of young faculty who more or less hung out together; sometimes we’d sit in on each other’s classes to learn a bit and to pick up teaching tips.
Someone from a different department did that with me and from time to time, we’d discuss the material. And sometimes, we’d talk later. One time she told me that she felt weak that day because she had been on a religious fast. I said “yes, you look a bit thin”.

I had forgotten about that but 1-2 days later she asked me to come to her office to talk. I said “sure”. When I got there she asked me “do you know what this is about”? I said “math”?

She said “no”..and went on to accuse me of sexual harassment because of my “you are looking thin” remark! I was incredulous.

The conversation got a bit heated “she said that she KNEW what I was thinking…” eventually it lead to my leaving..she extended her hand for a handshake but I refused.

I broke off all non-essential contact with her after that. Note: this incident was never brought up to any authority, etc.

It turns out there were a couple of things: while her academic research was respected, her personality…not so much.
But, I later found out that she had endured some genuine sexual harassment from within her department. Evidently a senior faculty member has asked her out on a date and she refused; he reminded her that “collegiality” was part of the tenure review process (note: she eventually became a full professor ..without “giving in”).

And so, it is possible for someone who has had genuine harassment to see harassment when it simply isn’t there.

Mere accusations, even from an honest person, will never be enough for me.

I’ve posted this video several times, and it is about accusations of sexual assault. But it goes to the point where stories from the two parties can diverge, even though both parties are telling the truth AS THEY SEE IT.

December 19, 2017 Posted by | social/political, yoga | | Leave a comment

Graduation exercises done…various topics

Grading done, graduation exercises done. So, aside from some “less than pleasant” family obligations I should enjoy a pleasant month.

Topics:
Sexual Harassment We are seeing lots of accusations and resignations..and in one case, a female was the accused.

I hope that we haven’t arrived at a place where an accusation is sufficient to tank someone’s career.

Example: 20+ years ago, I had a faculty friend who liked me well enough to sit in on one of my classes. She talked about a bunch of stuff..and in a conversation she had mentioned that she felt weak from a religious fast. I replied “yes, you are looking a bit thin”.

Later she asked me to come into her office. I did..she asked “do you know why I want to talk to you?” I responded “I guess it is about the course”. She went on to tell me that my remark was sexual harassment. I was astonished. I said “I meant…” and she said “I KNOW what you meant..” ..Eventually I had enough. She tried to shake my hand but I refused..and I broke off all unnecessary contact with her. No, no charges were ever filed and no official complaint was ever made.

By the way, she is a respected scholar (by our standards) but her personality…not as well respected.

And..it turns out that she HAD suffered some genuine sexual harassment; she was asked out by a senior faculty member; when she declined he told her that the tenure decision, in part, depended on her being “collegial”. So, it isn’t as if she always “cried wolf”.

So sometimes, people can honestly interpret the same situation differently:

So people who think that the issue can be resolved by hashtags, “zero tolerance”, “non-negotiable demands” and the like are delusional; the situation is way more complicated than that.

Republican Tax Scam Yes, they did fix some of the hits to higher education, but it is still a big giveaway to the wealthiest and will probably explode the deficit…which will lead to them cutting Social Security, Medicare and safety net programs because “we are broke”.

Oh, it is a wildly unpopular bill and might cost many of them their seats in 2018..but will also lead to some cushy K-Street jobs and the like. So the unpopularity of the bill bothers them not at all.

Bradley Basketball We saw the men demolish Arkansas Little Rock 86-46 despite clearing the bench.

They won big at Chicago State, though Chicago State got blistered by Northwestern 96-31..trailed 55-8 at the half. Still, the team is winning.

The women lost big at Green Bay, but Green Bay is ranked no. 21 for a reason.

Workout notes: yesterday, routine weight session. Usual PT, 5 sets of 10 pull ups, bench: 10 x 135, 6 x 185, 5 x 185, incline: 10 x 135. Military: dumbbell: 10 x 50, 10 x 45, machine: 10 x 80 (each arm), 3 sets of 10 x 110.

Today: easy 4.2 mile run prior to graduation exercises; clear and crisp.

December 17, 2017 Posted by | basketball, economy, education, political/social, politics, republicans, running, social/political, walking, weight training | , , | Leave a comment

More about sexual harassment, accusations and all that.

White Nationalism That is a harsh charge, but some careful parsing of election data showed that Trump’s support really didn’t come from those with economic anxiety but rather from those who missed “the way things were”. The conclusion:

Nevertheless, a majority of white voters backed a candidate who assured them that they will never have to share this country with people of color as equals. That is the reality that all Americans will have to deal with, and one that most of the country has yet to confront.

Yet at its core, white nationalism has and always will be a hustle, a con, a fraud that cannot deliver the broad-based prosperity it promises, not even to most white people. Perhaps the most persuasive argument against Trumpist nationalism is not one its opponents can make in a way that his supporters will believe. But the failure of Trump’s promises to white America may yet show that both the fruit and the tree are poison.

Now I hasten to point out that a society does need some shared “values” to get along (e. g. loud music in a neighborhood at night…I don’t like it be it country and western, rap, rock, or even classical) But just think about the people blowing a gasket because some NFL players kneel during the National Anthem? Who are those players hurting?

Tax Plan Orin Hatch doesn’t take kindly to being questioned. But his tax plan DOES harm..well, people who started where he did and favors the wealthy. How would he have done had his law scholarship been considered taxable income? There are times when I think that being comfortable with hypocrisy is a prerequisite for being a conservative.

Sexual Harassment: Sexism is a part of that, and Kareem Abdul Jabbar wrote another nice column about a male “jock” subculture. It is very thoughtful, IMHO. It concludes:

HBO’s True Detective got to the heart of the problem when Ani Bezzerides (Rachel McAdams) is asked why she carries so many knives and she explains, “Could you do this job if everyone you encounter could physically overpower you? … The fundamental difference between the sexes is that one of them can kill the other with their bare hands.” Nature may have created a physical imbalance, but society’s job is to not allow those with advantages — physical, financial or political — to exploit others.

Craziness: there is a poll about how Republicans and Democrats react to “accusations” of sexual harassment:

Yes, I am with the Republicans here. Accusations are one thing; credible evidence is something else altogether. And there are degrees: say, a drunken butt slap vs. an adult preying on 14 year olds. So, yes, if my candidate had been accused, I would still CONSIDER voting for them (that is how the question is phrased). Of course, when I mentioned that, some SJW “dumbsplained” me. They rarely disappoint.

But, there ARE voices of reason out there, I am happy to say.

Workout notes: yesterday, standard weights (PT, pull ups (5 sets of 10, went well), bench: 10 x 135, 6 x 185, 10 x 170 (good), incline: 10 x 135, military: 10 x 50 standing (thick dumbbells), 2 sets of 10 x 45, rows: 3 sets of 10 x 110 machine. Today: “quicker” 10K walk outside. Went ok.

November 22, 2017 Posted by | political/social, social/political, walking, weight training | | Leave a comment

Sexual Harassment allegations, training and effectiveness…

Yes, sexual harassment has been in the news (sometimes to the exclusion of the truly dreadful GOP tax bills that the Republicans are trying to push through)

Of course, I was dismayed to see the allegation against Al Franken. But then came another of a different type:

On the heels of Tweeden’s disturbing allegations, however, another woman came forward claiming that she too had been “stalked and harassed” by Franken. Melanie Morgan teased her accusation with a Tweet, and then directed curious readers to her website. On her website, she described how Franken called her more than once because he disagreed with how she was discussing a policy issue on the radio.

Even giving Morgan the extremely generous benefit of the doubt, it’s hard to pretend what she alleges Franken did is the same thing as what Tweeden’s picture shows Franken actually doing. Nor is what Tweeden’s picture shows, horrible as it is, the same as what somebody like Roger Ailes or Bill Clinton did.

Which gets to a problem. Right now, the court of public opinion is faced with the awkward task of assigning degrees of severity to sexual misconduct, because, while they all cause harm, they don’t all cause the same amount of harm and thus don’t merit the same punishment. Furthermore, punishment varies by the power the offender wields. A senator, for example, should have a much higher moral threshold than, say, a comedian. Writing in The New Yorker this week, Masha Gessen treads lightly in making this point, warning that the #MeToo moment could devolve into “sex panic” if we’re not careful. “The distinctions between rape and coercion are meaningful, in the way it is meaningful to distinguish between, say, murder and battery,” Gessen writes.

One’s political ideology or past advocacy doesn’t mean it’s impossible for a person to be victimized by somebody with opposing ideology. But if what she’s written is all she’s got, Morgan’s account reeks of naked political opportunism, of weaponizing victimhood in a way that is so morally bankrupt that it threatens to derail the entire #MeToo conversation for selfish political ends.

I’ve seen a case of this when I was at the University of Texas. The two people involved did not dispute the facts: a tenured faculty member called a non-tenured faculty member to complain about a professional matter. Sex was never brought up; the sole charge of “sexual harassment” was that the tenured person was male and the non-tenured one was female…and the call was at night.

Now, unless the tenured person made a habit of hassling female members, this was not sexual harassment; if anything, it was simple douchebaggery. Not all bad behavior between men with more power/status against females with lesser power/status is sexual harassment.

So what about things like genuine groping? (I say “genuine” because the Franken photo, while disgusting, didn’t involve actual groping. She was wearing a heavy flak vest.)

I’ve seen it a few times; one time in the Navy (woman claimed that a senior enlisted goosed her while he walked past) and one time I saw an academic tickle the butt of a female in his rock and roll band as she walked by…he was married to someone else but I didn’t know their respective status (were they friends? were they “that type” of friends?).

But I know it happens and it is wrong (if not consensual). And yes, it seems sad that we need to, as a society, condemn it to reduce it. But how?

I know that standard anti-sexual harassment training is ineffective; in fact, it might well make things WORSE. I have some guesses as to why.

But as far as why men have some urge that needs to be resisted: some of the popular ideas are, in my opinion, dumb. It isn’t anything to do with “sin” or, even worse, women being “sinful” by nature. And no, I doubt it is the result of women being “sexualized” by culture. Instead, I think the urge comes from simple evolutionary pressures to mate. Men aren’t evil for “wanting to”; it just acting on the urge that is the evil. Seriously, I think some of the pressure is taken off when we just admit this “hey, you might want to, and I don’t blame you, but you don’t get to.”. I honestly think some scientific thinking about the matter helps.

Workout notes: 10K walk yesterday. Today: weights; highlights is that pull ups were easier, 10 x 135, 5 x 185 (empty gym), 10 x 170, military: couldn’t get thick dumbbells, but still 10 x 50, 2 sets of 10 x 45, also goblet squats (2 sets of 10 x 45, 10 x 50, 10 x 60 to the sill), rows (machine), etc.

November 18, 2017 Posted by | social/political, walking, weight training | , | Leave a comment

Coming apart at the seams: allegations of sexual misconduct

I admit that between Facebook and Twitter..well, by the time I get the idea and time to write, something else has popped up!

Sexual harassment has been in the news. But interestingly enough, it appears that current sexual harassment training has made things…worse?

Sexual harassment courses aimed at preventing workplace discrimination can have the opposite effect, making men less capable of perceiving inappropriate behavior and more likely to blame victims, according to academic studies that cast doubt on traditional training programs.

One researcher who has questioned the effectiveness of harassment prevention classes is Lauren Edelman, a professor of law and sociology at the University of California Berkeley, the prestigious school that has been at the center of a series of high-profile faculty misconduct scandals in recent months.

“Sexual harassment training may, in fact, make it less likely that males will recognize situations that are harassing,” said Edelman, a faculty member in the renowned UC Berkeley law school, where Sujit Choudhry resigned as dean after he was found to have sexually harassed his executive assistant. “Sexual harassment training may provoke backlash in males.”

Studies testing the effects of harassment training are very limited, but some research has suggested counterintuitive and troubling consequences – that after men complete trainings, they may be more inclined to brush aside allegations and discount victims.

Some researchers believe trainings have no positive effects, tend to be more about legal cover than meaningful prevention or may even have unintended negative consequences – raising serious concerns about the way colleges and companies heavily focus on training as a solution to harassment.

This actually makes sense to me; many of these programs appear to be “check the box to reduce our liability” and, I wonder…how much of it comes from an outside speaker who just wags the finger and tells men that they are bad?

Tinkler has also studied how sexual harassment trainings can provoke backlash and how people who say they support harassment laws are resistant to the enforcement of those policies. Trainings can also reinforce men’s feelings that women are “emotional and duplicitous in the way that they both want sexual attention, but don’t want sexual harassment”, she explained.

Edelman, the UC Berkeley professor, said she suspects the backlash could stem from the “cartoonish, somewhat unrealistic” harassment examples that trainings often include – lessons that can make participants skeptical and resentful.

Yep. Now I know that situations differ from place to place..and sometimes signals can get crossed (friendliness be mistaken for being open to a sexual/romantic advance)

This is 40 minutes long, but Carol Tavris talks about campus sexual assault (a different thing, to be sure) and the ambiguity of communication:

Now here a type of thing that appears as if it would be effective (again, applied to college students):

You see: no finger wagging, no yelling at someone for what they didn’t do..but an affirmation of a positive attitude. Who could resent this? Well done.

And now we have the special Senate election in Alabama. Moore was accused of initiating sexual contact with a 14 year old…when he was a 3x year old lawyer.

And ..yes, the Republicans are, predictably, split:

And so I am hearing..from educated feminists, that women are going to take him down. Really? I’ve heard this before. And educated feminists don’t appear to speak to the non-educated women.

The race was listed as tied in a poll right after the allegations came out (with 86 percent of those polled having heard of them). Prior to that, the poll consensus was that Moore had a 8-9 point lead. Will this be enough….will this go the way of Clayton Williams vs. Ann Richards in Texas in 1990 where Williams JOKING about rape lead to his downfall in a very Republican state?

Workout notes; quick 5 mile walk yesterday (1:01:20..treadmill), 3 miles today after weights; usual PT, pull ups(5 sets of 10; switch grip on set 5) bench was 10 x 135, 6 x 185, incline: 7 x 150, military (dumbbell) 10 x 50, 10 x 45, 10 x 45, rows: 3 sets of 10 x 110 machine.

pull ups: I find that doing them with my hands turned inward is now harder than a wide grip???

November 10, 2017 Posted by | political/social, politics, republicans, republicans political/social, republicans politics, walking, weight training | | Leave a comment

Male sexual harassment: counter intuitive for me

I asked a question on Facebook about a hypothetical case: if someone had, say, a syndicated show and told a potential guest “if you reject my advances, you won’t be a guest on my show”, is this against the law? I asked because while I think that this is vulgar and immoral, I don’t know enough about the law to judge if it is illegal. After all, no one has an inherent right to be booked on a show. This question was based on a public accusation made against Sean Hannity.

The discussion got a bit sidetracked and one of my friends mentioned male sexual harassment. And the article had this photo:

Now, I am not a female so I don’t know how females might react to a photo of a male doing this to a female; my guess is that the reaction would be very negative (anger, etc.)

Ok, MY reaction to the above photo? My initial gut reaction was….”damn..wish that was me..I’d be returning the favor…nice skirt butt!” But that is an initial reaction to a hypothetical situation and it is part fantasy..not a part of my day to day life. And I am a senior faculty member.

So while I “get” that sexually harassing a male is not acceptable either, my “gut” response to something like the photo isn’t what I’d imagine a female’s response to the reverse situation. The emotions are different.

As far as my professional life (as an adult), I now realize that I had witnessed sexual harassment but did not realize what it was at the time.

Example: I was friends with some of the enlisted clerks at a Navy recruiting station. One of them told me that when a more senior male walked past her, he “goosed” her. I was taken by surprise. Note: her boss (a warrant officer) had told her to leave ME alone as she sometimes hovered over me when i was at the computer. Sometimes she would go past me and make it a point to walk between me and the computer screen. I really didn’t mind; though I was a young officer, I still thought of her as a friend and it didn’t bother me at all. Then again, I outranked her.

Another time, I saw a young officer grab a young enlisted man by the butt..the way that frat boys sometimes do with each other. The enlisted man told him to stop; he said “you know that you love it”. He was clearly annoyed. But this officer continued to get great fitness reports (and he WAS very professionally competent).

I didn’t know what to do; I was never reacted quickly to anything that I am not trained for.

Workout notes: easy 5 mile run; glorious day for it.

April 25, 2017 Posted by | running, social/political | , | Leave a comment

Double Standards…

3 girls

YES, I KNOW: “rubbing” and “passed out”. 🙂

But I wonder: how would a college handle this if, say, one photo was three guys over a woman versus this?

But yes, I can understand why there is a double standard as, at least for heterosexuals, males and females are a lot different. We are not blank slates.

I know if I were the guy in this photo, I’d be very annoyed that I was too comatose to enjoy what was happening. 🙂

Yes, sometimes, even guys get heterosexually raped (not talking about statutory; e. g. think of Garp), but that is rare, though perhaps not as rare as once thought.

December 4, 2014 Posted by | human sexuality, social/political | , | Leave a comment

Women getting Cat-calls

I saw this on a Facebook wall:

Now, of course, I had some questions. After all, this woman is more attractive than average and this WAS New York City.

As far as the New York City remark: a long time ago (1984) I took a date to New York City. She, while attractive, wasn’t “actress attractive” (visually). But I got several complements on how nice she looked; they were friendly remarks that she could hear..and was intended to hear.

I haven’t had that happen in other places, so I wondered how much of it was the culture. I also wondered how much of it was due to the woman, population density, etc.

So I posed the question on Facebook and invited Peoria women to chime in.

Of course, there was the expected “feminist soap box” stuff but even that was interesting; the women who commented didn’t agree with each other! It seems to me that some women were quick to “fit it into a feminist theory of patriarchy” framework; other women acknowledged that they have a sexual side and didn’t have a problem with that. Others were more “no biggie”.

But that was a digression; what I found surprising is that women DID report getting catcalls while running or walking in Peoria.

One reported that she got them when she ran instead of when she walked; she seemed surprised because she “was nasty” when she ran. I wasn’t; I’ve seen her in spandex. 🙂 Another talked about getting the cat calls “about half the time” when she ran alone; this one also has quite a pleasing shape in her spandex. NO, THIS DOESN’T EXCUSE IT and nor do I approve of it. But these are the sort of women I expect to receive attention.

But other women also reported it too.

There was also discussion about “what is a cat-call” and a side discussion about greeting strangers (I usually don’t as I run/walk, in part, to be alone).

I wonder if more comments are coming.

And no, I don’t issue cat calls…ok, only to those know now me and who have either “brought it on themselves or who have made cat calls to me. But that is a different story altogether.

October 28, 2014 Posted by | social/political | , , | 1 Comment