blueollie

Depressing state of politics

Ok, it is no secret that I never considered Donald Trump to be suitable POTUS material. Enough of my countrymen disagreed enough for him to squeak by in the Electoral College though he lost the popular vote by about 3,000,000 votes (and if you start complaining that is a fake statistic because of “illegals voting”, you are too stupid to be reading my blog, so just get lost right now).

Now our rough, tough, MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN president is…whining?

Pathetic. But it probably plays to his hard core supporters because, well, many of them are also whiny little victims. A great explanation is here: (and he uses a King Solomon story to help make his point)

Upshot: remember those pitiful “what has happened to my country” whines when President Obama was in office? (if you want to be nauseated, watch at 1:15)

They had an idea of what their country was like (no, it never was that way), and they had a skilled con man running to saying “he would make it great again” by…well, sticking it to the liberals. Sure the real agenda is the same as it always was (tax cuts for the wealthiest among us), and they sold it to the base by, well, attacking people like me.

So that brings me to the Democrats.

And I’ll say it: as evil as I think the elite Republican mission is (the tax cuts for the wealthy above all else), they are better politicians than we are. And their “message to the base” is an easier sale; all one has to do is to cherry pick a few ridiculous college campus incidents to get people fired up about how ridiculous liberals are (like this one)

(for the record: there are crackpot professors…but it has gotten so ridiculous that people who have never set foot in a college classroom see fit to tell me what goes on in colleges and how *I* brainwash students into not working hard, hating American, etc.)

So, what are Democrats about? We are supposed to be about a society that works for all, including the less talented, the disabled, the poor, the sick, those born into tough circumstances, etc.

And guess what? That is a tough sell. The Republicans glorify the rich…and well, most all of us want to be rich, or at least moderately comfortable.

Who wants to be poor, sick, laid off, mentally ill, or disabled?

We Democrats talk about safety nets (e. g. Medicaid) and minimum wages. BUT FEW WANT TO HAVE TO USE SAFETY NETS, TO BE ON MEDICAID OR TO WORK FOR MINIMUM WAGE. These policy issues are tough to rally around and those who would benefit the most vote at low rates. (directly, anyway; the economy does benefit from safety net programs). “The poor” is not that big of a voting block and much of the “working class” really isn’t poor.

Yes, there are people who will never grow much past a minimum wage job and Democratic policies might help them, but no one wants to face up to the fact that they are doomed to be stuck on that rung for life.

And so we get critiques of how well the Democrats are doing (and yes, “pathetic” is accurate). Oh, true, we did win the popular vote in 6 of the last 7 Presidential elections (2004 was the exception) but the EC hurt us in 2000 and really hurt us in 2016.

So we try to critique ourselves, and get, well, pathetic articles like this one. Example:

When the poll came out saying that “Democrats stand for nothing more than opposing” Trump, I thought to myself, ‘If only that were true!’” But they can’t even do that well. When House Democratic Caucus chairman Joe Crowley was asked by the Associated Press just what his party’s core message was, he “hesitated” and then said, “That message is being worked on.”

It was as tone deaf (but honest) an answer as when Mother Jones writer Kevin Drum – as sycophantic a representative of the Democratic party in the punditocracy as there is – wrote about how people would have to be “crazy” not to “have a reflective disgust” of people who are homeless and mentally ill.

Considering homeless people are also disproportionately black, LGBT, disabled and, of course, poor, Drum managed to reveal the disdain the liberal elite has of wide swaths of Americans.

Uh, I think the latter is just reality. Most people do have at least an internal “yuck” reaction to many of the homeless and mentally ill.

My response is that we need to use our morals and intellect to work past that “yuck” response ..and to realize that our discomfort might be born from fear that we are just a single (or a few) unlucky incidents from being just like that homeless or mentally ill person.

Example: what if I sustain a head injury that harms my ability to even do math, much less teach and research it? Oh sure, there is enough in the bank to have the home free and clear (and pay taxes) but what about that income? I have disability insurance, but times would get tougher, very quickly.

Nevertheless, articles such as the one I quoted attempt to throw cold water on what I think are needed, frank discussions.

And there is the old “Bernie would have won” bullshit. Yes, I am aware of the polls that showed him beating Trump head to head by bigger margins than Clinton was leading by..but you don’t think that the Trump analytics team would have absolutely vaporized Sanders? Please.

And some are saying he is the 2020 front runner? Oh, spare me. Oh yes, Hillary Clinton is not a great campaigner and I think that she is done, just as Al Gore was in 2000. But Bernie Sanders? Nope.

Oh well, this is why I haven’t written much about politics this year. I consider Trump to be dangerously incompetent and temperamentally unsuited for the job. But I consider my party to be politically incompetent.
In short, the Republicans can win elections but cannot govern; the Democrats can govern but suck at elections.

And yes, I think that the extreme political skill (and policy chops) of Bill Clinton and Barack Obama hid many of our party’s weaknesses. How many of these “purple unicorns” (blessed with show business AND policy skills like Pres. C and Pres. O) do we have?

It is just too depressing right now.

July 24, 2017 Posted by | Democrats, economy, politics, politics/social, republicans, republicans politics, social/political | | Leave a comment

Why do people lie about dumb stuff?

Yes, I can understand (but do not approve of) lying for gain and maybe even lying to not hurt someone’s feelings (in subjective matters…say, giving a sympathy “like” to someone’s …let’s just say, less than attractive selfie or “less than impressive but they appear to be proud of it” performance. No…I am not one who does this…ok, I might do this on very rare occasion but rarely with someone I consider to be a friend.

But why lie about..say, a time you ran, a weight you lifted, a team you claim to have played for, etc.? After all, someone who knows enough to be genuinely impressed will know that you are full of crap, and others..well, why seek approval from someone who doesn’t know the area?

Sometimes I wonder if it a sort of test..to see if you’ll attempt to “one up them”, in which case, they’ll know that you are a liar. It might be a way of sizing you up.

How I handle it: with someone I don’t know, I might say “wow…I’ve never even been close to that..here is what I’ve done…” and give them an honest accounting of what I’ve done.

It is amazing how many “400 lb. bench pressers“, “12-13 minutes per mile walkers”, former “NCAA/NFL” players there are out there. (*)

Workout notes:

Weights, rope skips, 2 mile run, goblet squats:

weights: rotator cuff, hip hikes, toe raises, pull ups (5 sets of 10, good), bench: 10 x 135, 4 x 190, 8 x 170, incline: 10 x 140, military: 15 x 55 dumbbell, (seated, supported), 10 x 45 standing, 20 x 40 standing, rows: 2 sets of 10 x 55 dumbbell (each arm), 10 x 110 machine.

2 mile treadmill run: 10:35 mile 1, 8:35 mile 2, 2.1 in 20:00
rope skips: 29, 34, 37 to get to 100. I am spastic….just awful.
goblet squats: 10 x 44 (to 24 inches), 5 x 60 (lower bench), 10 x 62 (24 inches), 5 x 60 (lower bench)

(*) And if you must know: I boxed in college PE class (made an 86 on my final), flamed out in high school sports, (football, wrestling) ran a 5:30 mile, bench pressed 310 (at 230 lbs. bodyweight; current best is 200 at 195 lbs. bodyweight, 57 years of age), 3:33 marathon (lifetime, 1980, 3:38 masters, 2000), 1:34 half marathon (1999, 40 years old), 18:57 5K (1982, 20:37 at 40), 39:50 10k (1982, masters best is 42:27 in 1999) 101 miles of walking in 24 hours (2004), 4:44 powerwalk marathon (2002, not judged), 2:17 half marathon powerwalk (monitored), judged racewalks: 8:31 1500, 18:03 3000, 30:42 5K, 2:27 20K, all between 42-43 years of age.

Swim: 1:36 5K swim (2008 Big Shoulders) , 15:36 1000 (my own), 15:59 official meet.

July 21, 2017 Posted by | running, social/political, weight training | , | Leave a comment

Resentments, public policy and politics

Kathleen Parker wrote an interesting column about the Republican attempts to repeal the ACA and to replace. Yes, I know; this is more or less a Republican plan to begin with which is built around the three pillars of “community rating, mandate, and subsidies

The community rating means that high risk people get charged the same as low risk people. So here, the strong subsidize the weak. The mandate means that everyone has to get in, not just the sick who need it right now. So the healthy subsidize the sick.

Then subsidies means the financially strong subsidize the financially weak.

And yes, this can lead to resentment. We all seem to know (or even have in our family) some worthless goof off or person who engages in risky behavior (smoking, overeating, drugging, being lazy, drinking to excess) or the irresponsible who either mooches or blows all of their money and then expects others to keep them afloat.

So there is no denying that losers will be helped by the responsible:

Many Americans simply don’t see the fairness in a system that requires them to pay high premiums for others’ poor health, some of which is, let’s face it, earned. Not deserved, but sometimes resulting from poor lifestyle choices. Why, indeed, should a single, childless 30-year-old male who runs three miles a day, eats rationally, and doesn’t drink, smoke or take drugs be saddled with insurance premiums to cover pregnancy, abortion, alcoholism, addiction, or an abundance of health consequences resulting from obesity and inertia?

For that matter, why should women have to subsidize men’s sexual- dysfunction curatives when, by the way, men don’t have to pony up for women’s corresponding, post-menopausal, medically appropriate intercessions? Here you see one of the finer-print dilemmas. We’d rather force nuns to concede tacit approval of abortion than insist that insurance subsidies be tied to healthy behaviors.

I’m sorry if this sounds heartless; the brain calls it reality. No wonder Obamacare was so difficult to craft and a replacement equally so. There are simply too many moving parts to make the sucker float — and too many reasons not to sink it.

Since McConnell’s repeal-only idea seemed doomed Tuesday afternoon after GOP Sens. Collins, Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.) and Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) said they oppose immediate repeal, perhaps, finally, Republicans and Democrats can snap on their wizard hats and cobble something workable together. After all, it’s the only thing they haven’t tried yet.

On the other hand:

1. Most of us know, at least on some level, that we are just a disaster away from needing help ourselves. We have weather, accidents, bad genetics, untimely diseases, etc. I have had several responsible, physically fit friends die early due to cancer. One can really “do everything right” and get horribly unlucky.

2. The economy: taking away health insurance and/or Medicaid will lead to move poverty, more people going bankrupt and damage our economy. Businesses need customers to stay in business.

So, I think the right thing to do is to bite the bullet and live with some slackers getting help that they really don’t “deserve”; overall, all of us are better off.

Now when it comes to discussing the issues of the day, Trump is so hated that some of my friends will not even talk to a Trump supporter. My big beef with Trump is that he is a rank amateur who doesn’t know what he is doing.

Oh well…yes, I am friends with some Republicans and I even regularly socialize with one.

Workout notes: disgustingly humid outside (and rainy) so I took indoor for 6 miles: 1 warm up on the treadmill, 32 laps in lane 2 in 49:47, doing “2 laps on, 2 laps off”:
12:55, 12:37, 12:12, 12:01, then a 13:47 “1 minute froggy” cool down mile (raised either incline, or speed every minute).

July 21, 2017 Posted by | politics, politics/social, social/political, walking | Leave a comment

They hate us. They really hate us.

I have no doubt that the elite Republicans are driven more by “upper end tax cuts” than anything else. But what about the other Republicans? Why are they so “meh” about the Trump campaign colluding with Russia (as indeed it did; there is no longer any doubt; what is debatable is the degree, how high up the collusion went, and the effect).

Paul Krugman has some thoughts that I think are worth pondering:

The important thing to notice is that almost the entire conservative movement has bought into one or both of these arguments. After all the flag-waving, all the attacks on Democrats’ patriotism, essentially the whole GOP turns out to be OK with the moral equivalent of treason if it benefits their side in domestic politics. Which raises the question: what happened to these people?

One answer might be that right-wing ideology, the commitment to tax cuts for the rich and pain for the poor, has such a grip on conservative minds that nothing else matters. But while this is true for some apparatchiks, my guess is that it’s not nearly as true for many – certainly not for the Republican base in the general public. So why has partisanship become so extreme that it trumps patriotism?

Well, I have a thought inspired by something my CUNY colleague Branko Milanovic wrote recently about civil wars. Branko – who knows something about Yugoslavia! – argues against the view that civil wars are caused by deep divisions between populations who don’t know each other. The causation, he argues, goes the other way: when a civil war begins for whatever reason, that’s when the lines between the groups are drawn, and what may have been minor, fairly benign differences become irreconcilable gulfs.

The Republicans need this rift to exist; they would not win on a “small government, low taxes on the rich” platform alone.

So they come up with something like Fox News and they push things. One was religion (the opponents are HEATHENS). Another: well, the LIBERALS are just awful. And yes, if you look hard enough, you can find leftists behaving badly (example)

(By the way: I am a college professor; I’ve worked (lived?) on college campuses for 31 years. Yes, there might be some SJW silliness here and there, and it should be challenged and opposed. Yes, there ARE SJW professors who are buffoons; a much, much higher percentage are reasonable human beings. But you are talking about a tiny, tiny, tiny part of what happens on a university. Most students have much more mundane concerns (money, social life, assignments, yes, even studying) and some are far more interested in parties than protests. Even most SJWs are reasonable human beings; only a small percentage are wacko, and those are the ones you see in the news. So the right wing focuses on perhaps 1-2 percent of what happens on a college campus..)

So right now: the push is “the liberals are horrible people and must be wrong about everything” so, if the liberals hate Russian collusion, then it must have been ok.
Krugman concludes:

And political figures either adapted or were pushed out. There once were Republicans who would have reacted with horror to Trump’s embrace of Putin, but they’ve left the scene, or are no longer considered Republicans.

This has troubling implications for both the short and the long run. In the short run, it probably means that no matter how bad the Trump revelations get, most Republicans, both in the base and in Congress, will stick with him – because taking him down would be a victory for liberals, who are worse than anything.

In the long run, it makes you wonder whether and how we can get the country we used to be back. As Branko says, there was a time when Serbs and Croats seemed to get along fairly well, indeed intermarrying at a high rate. But could anyone now put Yugoslavia back together? At this rate, we’ll soon be asking the same question about America

Oh well. Bottom line: we have to win those 2018 and 2020 elections.

Baseball notes Yes, I note the irony that I go to baseball games with a lot of people who probably voted for Trump. 🙂 If they knew how I voted… lol..

The Chiefs won 4-1 last night; due to a commitment I missed the first inning and the first Chiefs run. But I did catch 3 home runs early in the game (one by the Captains, two by the Chiefs) and saw the Chiefs add an insurance run to salt the game away.

Workout notes
Yes, I know, not much: 2 mile walk after easy weights:

PT Stuff (hip hikes, toe raises, rotator cuff), pull ups (5 sets of 10, ok), bench press: 10 x 135, 4 x 190, 5 x 185,
military press: barbell: 6 x 95, 10 x 85, dumbbell: 20 x 40 standing dumbbell, machine incline: 10 reps with 140, rows: dumbbell: 3 sets of 10 x 65
abs: 3 sets of 10 moving bridge, 2 sets of 12 twist crunch, 2 sets of 10 yoga leg lifts, headstand (ok, this time).

July 14, 2017 Posted by | baseball, social/political, walking, weight training | , | Leave a comment

Going on and one when you don’t know..

Ok, yes, at baseball games, and football games, I sometimes wonder “why did the coach do that?” But I admit that I don’t understand the reasoning; not only am I not around the team that often, I also have only a “fan who played a bit in high school” knowledge of the game..and that was the game back in the 1970’s. So I’d never tell a coach how to run his/her team, even if I do offer some advice from the stands.

I did that last night during the Chiefs 10-3 win over the Lake County Captains.

There were stories aplenty. The Chiefs got 3 home runs, 2 hit by the guy who had his mother at the game. The Chiefs had a nice (but hardly insurmountable) 6-3 lead, after a 3 run 7’th inning which featured 2 home runs.

Then in the 8’th, the Captains got themselves in trouble after retiring 2 of the first 3 Peoria batters (one walk). Another walk brought on a new pitcher and an infield hit loads the bases. Then the pitcher walked 3 batters in a row! Another infield hit brought in another run before a strike out.

It was kind of nice to see the other team’s bullpen self destruct, though the Captains made one infield error and some of the “infield hits” appeared to be misplays to me.

It was very warm; that plus the long game (3:17) took a toll on the fans (and pitchers)

Now back to the original headline we see that higher education is under fire from the rank and file Republicans.

Why? My guess (from attempting to talk to some of them…OMG that was painful) is that they see some very real, very bad things and conclude that colleges and universities are basically students go there to learn how to become sensitive, get offended and to demand “safe spaces”.

And so many who have rarely, IF EVER, actually set foot on a college campus TELL ME what is happening on college campuses.

Yes, the stories one hears are real and troubling, and yes, we can (and should) do better. But these stories constitute only a tiny fraction of what goes on; evidently such critics have no idea at the amount of important learning and research goes on (engineering, science, languages, history, culture, etc.).

They KNOW what they read and see, and they see fit to tell me what …well, happens in my own workplace?

At times, it appears that those who know the least have the strongest opinions.

Workout notes 2 mile run in 22:50 (second mile was “run 200, run/walk 200”..just wasn’t into it) and goblet squats: 10 x 44, 50, 53, 5 x 70 (touch the bench).

I know; it is this Sunday that counts.

July 13, 2017 Posted by | baseball, running, social/political | | Leave a comment

Why “across the aisle” dialog is so tough..often impossible…

Yes, we now know that at least elements of the Trump campaign attempted collusion with Russia. But do not expect this to change much.

Despite some noisy (and I think, disingenuous appeals for funding) rhetoric from Democrats:

And yes, one Democrat has filed an article of impeachment, we all know that is going nowhere. The R’s control the House. Nixon’s disapproval ratings were about 38 percent among Republicans whereas Trump’s approval rating among Republicans remains well in the 80’s (via Gallup)

So, these reports, which seem like “blockbuster” stuff to so many of us, will be “just politics” at best and “fake news” at worst to most of the rank and file Republicans.

It CAN help our political position though.

And trying to talk about issues; all too many think they know way more they do, and some of the loudest, most opinionated, know the least.
I’ve had people who rarely, if ever, step foot on a college campus tell me what is happening on them. I’ve even had people tell ME what I teach in the classroom…and such people get very offended when I tell them that I was unaware that there were “unAmerican” methods for integrating a function in calculus class. 🙂

But by Jove, they are SURE that they know.

There are times when I believe that those who know the least are the most sure about what they “know”.

Workout notes
4 mile walk after weights.

Weights: rotator cuff, hip hikes, toe raises, pull ups (5 sets of 10, so-so), incline presses: 10 x 135, 4 x 160, 7 x 150, military presses: 15 x 55 (seated, supported), 10 x 45 (standing), 10 x 100 (machine) rows: 2 sets of 10 x 55 dumbbell, 10 x 110 machine.

Not much.

July 12, 2017 Posted by | political/social, politics/social, social/political, walking, weight training | | Leave a comment

Most vicious people on Twitter are…NOT Trump supporters…

Ok, it is amateur hour in the White House and now we are getting “he is too dumb to have known better” defense (with regard to attempted collusion with the Russians)

And yes, it appears that actual campaign laws were broken.

Now of course, this needs to be investigated, sorted out and appropriate legal penalties should be applied.

As far as “ending the Trump presidency”: really, the way we can do that is to win a bunch of seats in the 2018 midterms, and yes, win the 2020 election. Forget President Trump being removed from office; even with a potential Democratic House, we are never getting a 2/3 majority of the Senate.

We need to win at the ballot box, and investigations can help us have a more fair election next time.

Now about my headline a fellow Democrat pointed out that the people nastiest to them were not Trump supporters but rather Sanders supporters! And yes, I can believe that.

It seems that many of the Bern victims just “know” that if their message got out, people would just flock to Bernie’s platform because it is just so righteous, just and, well, “reasons”.

Trump supporters might not like people like me, or see me as naive, wrong headed, or whatever. But they will admit that there are lots of people like me out there. Bernie supporters: well, if you don’t support Bernie, it is because you don’t know Bernie, or because you are some establishment dupe, etc. For many of them, it is “all slogans, all of the time”.

Workout notes 4 mile treadmill run in 42:50; 30 minutes of “5 minute Froggy” then 12:30 of 2:30 Froggy. Then a 1 mile cool down walk.

4 miles at this effort was once 37-38 minutes (in 2009) Oh well.

July 12, 2017 Posted by | running, social/political, walking | , | Leave a comment

Amateur Hour …

Yes, there are many reasons that Donald Trump pulled out the 2016 election in the Electoral College. But, overall, the Republican voters stuck with the Republican; that was far and away the biggest factor. What one identifies with means more than anything else.

Oh yes, his campaign (at least certain members of it) did attempt to collude with Russia; they admitted as much. And just a small change in a handful of states could well have made the difference.

But one way or another, he “won”.

And so far, it has been terrible. Donald Trump clearly doesn’t know what he is doing. And yet, the Republicans in Congress support him, though they might make a “this is troubling” statement once in a while.

Workout notes weights only; I am kind of tired.
hip hikes, toe raises, goblet squats: 25, 25, 50, 50, 60, 60, 70, pull ups (5 sets of 10) bench presses: 10 x 135, 1 x 190, 5 x 185, 8 x 170, incline: 10 x 140, military: seated: 15 x 55 dumbbell, standing: 10 x 45, machine: 10 x 200. rows: 2 sets of 10 x 55, 10 x 110 machine. abs: 2 sets of 12 twist crunch, 10 yoga leg lifts. Fell over on head stand.

July 10, 2017 Posted by | 2016, political/social, social/political, weight training | Leave a comment

Wanted to be accepted without being acceptable …

I chuckled when a FB friend posted this:

The individual who posted this did so in a tongue-in-cheek way.

But it did get me to thinking about what I’ve actually seen. I teach college. And from time to time, a student will complain about flunking a class. But often their complaints will be “I needed this class and those credits to…” (insert “keep my scholarship”, “get my job”, etc.)

And, because I teach mathematics, their complaints are almost never “I did this correctly and didn’t receive proper credit” or “I knew the stuff and you flunked me anyway”. To them, the “grade” and “credit” is really a commodity that I have and that they want; “knowledge”, “learning”, and “performance” are almost always completely unrelated.

It would be like a prospective surgeon always botching the cadaver operation but wanting a pass, or a prospective pilot always crashing in the simulator but wanting a “pass” from pilot school.

It is the old “accept me” rather than “help me so I can work to meet the standards”.

Another note Needless to say, poor people are not the most popular people in our society and are often blamed for their fate. The article I linked to purports to ask “why”. It is a decent article, but I find it strange that the author doesn’t see the reaction to poor people as being natural.

The headline is: “Why do we think poor people are poor because of their own bad choices?” so I’ll give my answer:

1. Our own experience. Quick: what poor people to you actually KNOW? (not merely read about or have seen somewhere)

Chances are, it is the family mooch. In our case, this sibling of a family member had the same parents, the same educational opportunities, the same upbringing, the same inheritance (well into 6 figures), and managed to piss it all away.

Parents will often see some of their kids do well, while others become chronic underachievers.

So when we hear “poor people”, we think of the examples that we know, rather than someone who grew up devoid of realistic opportunities. We look at the negative outliers that we know and try to extrapolate.

2. Social pathology. Yes, poor people tend to share some very bad, self destructive habits. Of course, research tends to show that this behavior tends to stem from poverty rather than the other way around. “Being poor makes you stupid” as some might say. The direction of causation isn’t always clear.

3. Fear. Yes, though I am comfortable at the moment (and close to being “long term comfortable”), at mostly points of my life, I was really only a bad break away from personal disaster (untimely illness, injury, lay off, employer going out of business just when I become unemployable), etc. No one wants to think “I am one bad break away from being just like that poor person” so we conjure up reasons why “it can’t happen to us because we are so virtuous” or something.

July 7, 2017 Posted by | education, politics/social, social/political | , | Leave a comment

My ‘Merica Post…

Yeah, yesterday was 4’th of July, which is Independence Day.

I wondered: what makes the United States different? Yes, I know, most countries (all?) have some sort of identity; what is ours?

Two things come to mind.

When I was in the Navy, we made port calls. And before we visited a port in a foreign country, we got a briefing on the customs and on the culture of where we were visiting.

When we visited Italy, we were told this: when you visit a small shop, if the owner is having a conversation, they aren’t going to stop it to wait on you. Remember that the shop was probably the family shop, and that is all they are ever going to be; they aren’t worried about expanding, moving up, defeating the competition, etc. So just be patient.

And that goes to the lesson many Americans grow up with: The American Dream to “make it big” (I was going to be a professional athlete, you see).

One other: when I visited the Anne Frank House, they had a theater where they would show some situation and ask “what is more important, Factor X or Factor Y (e. g. they would show a newspaper article about a recent controversy). The Americans were all over FREEDOM OF SPEECH ahead of the other factors (say, protection from discrimination)…as was I.

Of course, at this time in our history, we are pretty divided, as this Horsey cartoon shows:

So, where does this divide come from? Well, for one, our history is complicated. Our past citizens DID take risks..they had guts. But they also did terrible things too:

So, what do we focus on?

And as far as the American Dream, well, where some do make it big, our social/economic mobility isn’t what we would like to think it is. And I think this is where the division comes from.

Some liberals push for a higher minimum wage (and too high of a minimum wage can cause problems) and for health care for the poor. That is great, but…newsflash: people do not want to be poor, and no one dreams of being stuck in poverty, even though..for many, that IS where they are going to be.

So measures that favor the poor…while they are effective, really aren’t that popular (until they are actually implemented and have been in place for a while)

So what wins out: dreaming (you are going to be rich one day), or practical reality (that you won’t be)?

What I did on the 4’th of July:

In the morning, I took Tracy to Galva to run a 5K (and did poorly: 30:05) and in the evening, baseball!

The Chiefs beat the Snappers and won 5-1 behind some good pitching, spectacular fielding (they robbed the Snappers of at least 3 hits) and 2 home runs.

I sat behind the 3’rd base dugout (visitor’s dugout at Chiefs games; home dugout at Bradley games)

there was a brief rain delay.

But it turned out to be a fun day:

And a decent crowd.

Other 4’th of July images

From a local parade (I did not see it)

And what is more “Merican” than yoga pants?

Workout notes
weights and a 5K walk (42:45, from intervals)

rotator cuff, hip hikes toe raises, pull ups (2 sets of 5-5-5, 2 sets of 10), goblet squats 50-75 (up very 5, sets of 5), incline: 10 x 135, 5 x 160, 7 x 150 (good hips on last set, so so on second set), military: 15 x 55 dumbbell, seated, supported, 10 x 45 standing, 10 x 90 lifemachine, rows: 2 sets of 10 x 55 (each arm), 10 x 110 machine, 2 sets of moving bridge, 12 twist crunch, 10 yoga leg lifts, headstand (good).

July 5, 2017 Posted by | baseball, Friends, politics, politics/social, social/political, walking, weight training | , , | Leave a comment