Homework and futility …

Workout notes: (speaking of futility)

rotator cuff
squats: lots of weightless squats, a few goblet squats with 25, one set with 40, finished with 10 x 210 leg press
pull ups: 15-10-10-10-5
bench press: 10 x 135, 4 x 185, 7 x 170 (weak)
incline press: 6 x 150 (weak), 10 x 135
military: 7 x 50 dumbbell standing, 10 x 45 standing, 10 x 40 standing (couldn’t get 50’s in the air while sitting)
rows: 3 sets of 10 with 50 (single arm)
abs 2 sets each of 12 twist crunch, 10 yoga leg lifts, 10 moving half-bridge.
headstand (surprisingly good)

Bad math/science puns



Homework and futility Yes, I know that hard work can get most people, at least of a certain age, to improve on something.
But, well, let me use an example. Take any Division I football coach. What do they spend their time on? Sure, they set up game strategy, decide to who play and set up how to train their players. BUT…they spend a lot of time…recruiting talent. If talent didn’t matter, why is recruiting important?

Again, average players can improve with good coaching and hard training, but only so much.

I think that a similar principle applies in academics.
Sure, students say that they work hard in my classes, but these are college students; those in my engineering/science/mathematics section have a certain aptitude for the subject. Teaching and hard work bring out their talent. But they have it to begin with.

But what about grade school? Don’t they have to take everyone (within reason)?

So, I question the value of assigning too much homework to grade school kids. Again, I am talking about “too much for their level”.
Since this isn’t my field of study, I don’t know what the evidence says, though this post “seems” reasonable to me.

And there is something else going on here: I remember not doing much homework as a kid, and I sure as heck got no help from my parents. Yes, “that was then”. But…I can tell you that students who show up as freshmen in this day and age really aren’t any better prepared than we fact, I’d say “somewhat less so”?

And I do wonder:

Research tells us the following about the impact of homework on children in primary school:

Homework offers no academic advantage. Instead, it overwhelms struggling children and is boring for high achievers.

Interesting…I’ll keep my eyes open for what else is out there.

September 9, 2016 Posted by | education, social/political, weight training | Leave a comment

Uncertainty …

Workout notes weights only; I was going to walk but I ended up thinking that I needed some rest.

pull ups: 15-15-10-10 (good)
rotator cuff
squats: a few weightless sets
bench press: 10 x 135, 4 x 185, 8 x 170
incline: 10 x 135
military: 2 sets of 10 x 45 standing (dumbbell), 15 x 50 dumbbell (seated, supported0
rows: 2 sets of 10 x 110 machine, 10 x 50 (single arm) dumbbell
2 sets of: 12 twist crunch, 10 yoga lifts, 10 moving half bridges
headstand (easy today)

It seems that on most days, I have a few exercises where I feel good, others where I am “meh”. Today, pull ups were very good. Friday: bench press was good.

Uncertainty Ok, I am 57 years old (minus one day) and I’ve never trained for a marathon at this age. I get the sense that I am saturated with training, and I should probably start a loooong taper..a very gradual taper. Yes, the first marathon is 4 weeks away, and I do have some more 15 milers planned. And yes, I’ll be walking during my marathons; these will be “run/walk”. My days of “racing” these bad boys are over.

And the uncertainty extends to teaching as well. I am always wondering “how much detail do I provide” in a first course? Too much: loses all but the best students. Too little: I end up shortchanging the students. This is the challenge of teaching “a first course”.

Baseball: what a fun season. I saw more games last weekend; yesterday’s was rained out but there is a double header tonight.




The Chiefs have split with the Bees: they won 3-0 on Friday, getting all their runs in the 3’rd inning, and fell 7-5 when the Bees hit the ball very well (2 home runs). And there is this aspect of minor league baseball: some parent clubs have decided to keep their minor league teams more or less intact. On the other hand, the Cardinals have been promoting many Chiefs; hence the team you see in the play offs might not resemble the one that got there. It should be interesting.

August 29, 2016 Posted by | baseball, education, walking | | Leave a comment

Hooray! My shirt is “right side out” today!

Workout notes: ugh…legs were sore and …while not dead, did NOT feel good.
So I took it on the treadmill for 10K (6.21 miles), starting at 5.2 mph and increasing speed by .1 mph every 5 minutes until 50 minutes, then 6.2-6.5 for the last 10 minutes (increasing every 2.5 minutes). That got me to 5.75 miles in 1 hour, then to 10K in 1:04:40 (machine gives you 5 cool down minutes).

Then I walked outside. I didn’t time myself nor did I have my smart phone; I figured this was “about 2 miles”: ha ha ha ha!


Academia I applaud the University of Chicago for this. They notify their incoming freshmen that there are no “safe spaces”, “trigger warnings”, etc.

Friendship Yes, a lack of friends can be deadly. Ironically, those who complain to me about loneliness have done their best to make it impossible to be friends with them to begin with.🙂

August 25, 2016 Posted by | education, running, walking | , , , | Leave a comment

Why “I am offended” isn’t good enough: education in the humanities

Watch this:

Now what was your reaction? Was it: ‘well, he is just stating a truth that we often don’t say out of politeness”? Was it: “how DARE he say that…I am OUTRAGED” ?

Those two reactions are really different sides of the same coin.

My reaction: “he is completely wrong but doesn’t understand why”. And that is one, of many reasons, that I value history and the humanities. That is one reason (among many) that we need all majors (including STEM majors) to take such courses. And that is why the increasing disrespect of the humanities (sometimes an earned disrespect) worries me.

Being able to be outraged isn’t the same as being educated. And, I truly wonder what percentage of people could explain why Rep. King’s statement was nonsense.

July 19, 2016 Posted by | education, social/political | | 2 Comments

College these days

I haven’t seen much of what is being deseribed here and here at my university. I do think that there is a fine line between being responsive to student needs and holding students accountable for their learning. Learning isn’t passive and it involves the students working AND changing. And, students don’t know what is best for them, though they often think that they do.

It is just so easy to fool yourself into thinking that you know something that you don’t really know. And, yes, becoming educated often involves entertaining ideas that one does not like.

June 22, 2016 Posted by | education, free speech, Uncategorized | | Leave a comment

My take on a professor’s lament

A college professor writes:

Salon is running a particularly poorly thought-out piece, even by Salon standards, about the inability of college students to use the English language to express themselves in writing. I’ll let the author off the hook for the stupid title (“Death to High School English”) and the tagline, as an editor probably chose those. But the argument overlooks such an obvious explanation in favor of a more complicated one that it’s difficult to take whoever she is seriously. When the tagline asks, “My college students don’t understand commas, far less how to write an essay. Is it time to rethink how we teach?” We could do that, I guess. Or we could rethink how we grade them in high school.

There is a tendency, even among educators, when outcomes are not as they should be to assume that teachers as individuals or the educational system writ large must be to blame. In this case we’re hypothetically dismantling all K-12 English education and starting over from scratch with some sort of newer, better method. What this overlooks is the reality that most students in college – the same ones the author rightly points out are terrible at writing – have no idea that they’re terrible at writing. They think they are quite good at it, in fact. They do not believe this because of simple arrogance or Those Darn Millennials or any other popular explanation. They believe they are good writers because they have been getting good grades on written assignments and in English throughout their educational careers.

The rest of the piece at Gin and Tacos is worth reading.

Now I have never tried to teach anyone how to write, aside from supervising a senior project and reading student’s mathematical proofs. I have had some conversations with English faculty and I remember one saying: “I can get most students to an A…..” at which case I wondered if was the STUDENT who was supposed to get THEMSELVES to the grade.

Here is what was going on, I think: many professors let students rewrite and rewrite their papers prior to turning in the final copy. This makes me wonder: at what point is the professor actually grading their own work rather than the work of the student? I can easily see a student learning how to game the system by, in effect, getting the professor to write their work for them. Hence, they get a good grade by producing a polished paper, and move on to the next class not having learned a thing, other than how to get someone else to fix up their writing.

At some point, someone has to kick up the training wheels!

Now, on a related note, I am not without guilt. Yes, I think that I assign grades fairly; I let the spread sheet do the calculations, and then I move the student names off of the screen and just look at the numbers. Yes, at times, I’ve used cut offs that were slightly more generous than those stated on the syllabus, though, again, I am looking at the numbers and NOT at the names.

But, that aside, even strange things can happen.

In one case, a student with a 98 average made an 86 on the final exam, which still gave the student an A. But on ONE other problems (the rest of the exam was good), I was told: \int^{\infty}_0 e^{-3x} dx = lim_{b \rightarrow \infty} \frac{e^{-3x+1}}{-3x+1}|^b_0 . Yes, the student aced the other integral problems, including the trig substitution problem as well as the substitution problem \int e^{sec(x)}sec(x)tan(x) dx . The error that the student made on that problem was just plain inexplicable.

In another case, a linear algebra student missed problem one, which was to determine the determinant of a two by two matrix of integers! But the student got enough of the other problems right to end up with a (low) C for the course, including one that involved finding eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a 2 by 2 matrix.

Anyway, I shudder to think of these students making such errors in a subsequent class the their instructors finding out that they had their previous class from me.🙂

Go figure.

May 17, 2016 Posted by | education, mathematics, social/political | | Leave a comment

Those who need to try harder…

Workout notes: first, I weighed 190.0 prior to swimming (a LOT of coffee beforehand) and 187.5 afterward. Yes, I ate too much meat last night.
Swim: I had slightly sore shoulders last night. But 3100 yards was no problem:
500 easy, then: 5 x 100 alt fist/free on 2:10 (1:48-1:52), 5 x 100 25 catch up, 75 free on 2:10 (1:50ish), 5 x 100 alt. drill, free (front, 3g), 5 x 100 (25 fly, 75 free) on 2:10 (1:55 each).
Then 200 back, 100 side, then 100 pull, 100 free, 100 pull.

Run: riverplex track, 32 laps of the outer lane in 39:52 (10:49, 10:09, 10:02, 8:51). At the advertised 7 1/3 laps to the mile, this was 9:14 pace with miles being 9:55, 9:18, 9:12, 8:12.
There was an older guy in lane 3 who wouldn’t let me pass him; he picked it up every time and mostly stayed just a step ahead of me. I think it was fun for both of us; I gave him a “I’ve got 1 lap to go” warning at the end.

Jerry Coyne weighs in on why the study of literature appears to be waning. This sort of dovetails into Steven Pinker’s claim that literature may have helped make society less violent by allowing us to empathize with others.

US Sailors: caught and released by Iran. Yes, I like a President who bends over backwards to avoid a violent response.

Trying harder I’ve kept up with the St. Louis losing the Rams back to Los Angeles story. There was some anger and self pity as well as sober self-reflection.

One view I am reading is “wow, ST. Louis went out of its way to try to keep the Rams; Oakland and San Diego did nothing and yet they still have their teams. That doesn’t make sense”.

Well, it might. San Diego and Oakland are probably better markets; Oakland for being in the Bay Area and Sand Diego is a more prosperous region. True, the Rams sold out when they were good, and the crowds grew sparse as the team got worse. But compare this to, say, the almost always mediocre Bears. Their tickets were always more in demand, even when the team stunk. It is a much bigger market.

Of course, there is the caveat that there was a reason the Rams left Los Angeles to begin with. I remember making a game in 1984; the Rams were a playoff team that featured 2000+ yard running back Erick Dickerson. And yet tickets were plentiful and I had a whole row of seats to myself; the announced attendance was 47,800. A losing Rams team got more than that in St. Louis.

But evidently they see potential.

January 13, 2016 Posted by | Barack Obama, education, NFL, politics, politics/social, running, swimming | Leave a comment

Between classes

I’ve got incentive: IF I get done with grading I’ll get to watch the clowns the Republican debate…and maybe, just maybe, catch the Rams last game in St. Louis on Thursday night. Yes, Donald Trump fascinates me, and yes, his ideas are really mainstream Republican ideas. What the Republican elites object to is his tone and manner of presenting such ideas directly.

I’m done with scoring the final exams for one class and about to start another batch.

Workout notes: 10K shuffle (aka run) in Bradley Park; I was a wee bit faster today than I had been recently. Great weather for December in Illinois (slightly chilly; leggings under shorts was overkill). I didn’t have the “fire in the belly” to push the pace though.

Quick posts

A friend sent me this. There is some truth in this, even for math research talks. Here is what often happens to me: I’ll go to a research talk in an area that is “sort of close” to mine. Now keep in mind that while I’ve been modestly active, because I am a small college professor, my research has been rather narrowly focused.

So the talk might start with some concept that I’ve seen before, perhaps 20-30 years ago. My mind will try to recall that concept and make sense of it….and by the time I return the speaker has moved on and I am hopelessly lost. The good news is that if the topic isn’t too far away, I can often find the speaker’s notes and study them later.


Science and Spandex


But, but…I was just studying the Periodic Table!

Affirmative Action Yes, I am in favor of affirmative action…done correctly. Many opponents of affirmative action don’t have their facts straight. But some who support affirmative action don’t have their facts straight either.

I am no fan of Justice Scalia but, in my opinion, he had a valid point when he said that some students would actually be harmed by being put into academic programs that they weren’t ready for. Yes, that applies to white students too (some elite universities have “regional affirmative action” which I’ve seen applied to not only racial minorities but to, say, white students from underserved rural areas).

The Naval Academy (and the other service academies) have prep schools to get promising recruits up to speed academically prior to entering and, for the most part, it does little good to throw underprepared students to the wolves before they are ready.

December 15, 2015 Posted by | education, mathematics, republicans, republicans politics, running, science, social/political, spandex | , , , | Leave a comment

Frogs and some college issues…

Frogs There is an African frog, known as the rubber frog, which evidently found a way to mimic the chemical signature of a particularly vicious type of ant. The ants don’t recognize this frog as something to attack and eat. This is called “chemical camouflage”.

Colleges and universities There have been a few articles in the news about student unrest in universities; for example. Now I linked to an article from The Nation (written by a professor) which, of course, enables this sort of behavior (e. g. students issuing “demands” to college presidents and the like).

What is going on? Jerry Coyne directs us to this Jonathan Haidt article: he claims that certain groups are conferred “victim status” even while in high school and everyone else is told to “shut up and listen” (so to speak). He comments that this happens in high school:

And Centerville High is not alone. Last summer I had a conversation with some boys who attend one of the nation’s top prep schools, in New England. They reported the same thing: as white males, they are constantly on eggshells, afraid to speak up on any remotely controversial topic lest they be sent to the “equality police” (that was their term for the multicultural center). I probed to see if their fear extended beyond the classroom. I asked them what they would do if there was a new student at their school, from, say Yemen. Would they feel free to ask the student questions about his or her country? No, they said, it’s too risky, a question could be perceived as offensive.
You might think that this is some sort of justice — white males have enjoyed positions of privilege for centuries, and now they are getting a taste of their own medicine. But these are children. And remember that most students who are in a victim group for one topic are in the “oppressor” group for another. So everyone is on eggshells sometimes; all students at Centerville High learn to engage with books, ideas, and people using the twin habits of defensive self-censorship and vindictive protectiveness.
And then… they go off to college and learn new ways to gain status by expressing collective anger at those who disagree. They curse professors and spit on visiting speakers at Yale. They shut down newspapers at Wesleyan. They torment a dean who was trying to help them at Claremont McKenna. They threaten and torment fellow students at Dartmouth. And in all cases, they demand that adults in power DO SOMETHING to punish those whose words and views offend them. Their high schools have thoroughly socialized them into what sociologists call victimhood culture, which weakens students by turning them into “moral dependents” who cannot deal with problems on their own. They must get adult authorities to validate their victim status.
So they issue ultimatums to college presidents, and, as we saw at Yale, the college presidents meet their deadlines, give them much of what they demanded, commit their schools to an ever tighter embrace of victimhood culture, and say nothing to criticize the bullying, threats, and intimidation tactics that have created a culture of intense fear for anyone who might even consider questioning the prevailing moral matrix. What do you suppose a conversation about race or gender will look like in any Yale classroom ten years from now? Who will dare to challenge the orthodox narrative imposed by victimhood culture? The “Next Yale” that activists are demanding will make today’s Centerville High look like Plato’s Academy by comparison.

There are some tough issues that deserve a fearless and complete intellectual investigation (e. g. is affirmative action a good idea?) and shouting down different points of view…well…that does no good at all. After all, are people spending lots of time, effort and money to find ways to be offended?

And speaking of higher education, I wish that columnists who write “colleges and universities should do this” actually knew what they were talking about. This person does not. Example: when he talks about faculty and summer, he should have researched the topic; he would have found out that many of us (tenured professors) have 9-10 month contracts. As far as costs: the new technology (computers, internet) is a huge cost driver. A professor writes a nice response.

December 3, 2015 Posted by | education, frogs, science | , , , | Leave a comment

Student unrest at college campuses: speaking up vs. making policy

I think that I’ve figured out how I feel about these various issues (Missouri, Yale, etc.)

Students can (and should) speak up about the problems that they encounter (e. g. racism, intimidation, etc.)

However, they are NOT qualified to prescribe policy. Note: I am NOT saying that they shouldn’t voice their ideas. I am saying that those who know better (or should know better) shouldn’t let them dictate policy.

November 13, 2015 Posted by | education, social/political | , | 1 Comment