blueollie

Depressing state of politics

Ok, it is no secret that I never considered Donald Trump to be suitable POTUS material. Enough of my countrymen disagreed enough for him to squeak by in the Electoral College though he lost the popular vote by about 3,000,000 votes (and if you start complaining that is a fake statistic because of “illegals voting”, you are too stupid to be reading my blog, so just get lost right now).

Now our rough, tough, MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN president is…whining?

Pathetic. But it probably plays to his hard core supporters because, well, many of them are also whiny little victims. A great explanation is here: (and he uses a King Solomon story to help make his point)

Upshot: remember those pitiful “what has happened to my country” whines when President Obama was in office? (if you want to be nauseated, watch at 1:15)

They had an idea of what their country was like (no, it never was that way), and they had a skilled con man running to saying “he would make it great again” by…well, sticking it to the liberals. Sure the real agenda is the same as it always was (tax cuts for the wealthiest among us), and they sold it to the base by, well, attacking people like me.

So that brings me to the Democrats.

And I’ll say it: as evil as I think the elite Republican mission is (the tax cuts for the wealthy above all else), they are better politicians than we are. And their “message to the base” is an easier sale; all one has to do is to cherry pick a few ridiculous college campus incidents to get people fired up about how ridiculous liberals are (like this one)

(for the record: there are crackpot professors…but it has gotten so ridiculous that people who have never set foot in a college classroom see fit to tell me what goes on in colleges and how *I* brainwash students into not working hard, hating American, etc.)

So, what are Democrats about? We are supposed to be about a society that works for all, including the less talented, the disabled, the poor, the sick, those born into tough circumstances, etc.

And guess what? That is a tough sell. The Republicans glorify the rich…and well, most all of us want to be rich, or at least moderately comfortable.

Who wants to be poor, sick, laid off, mentally ill, or disabled?

We Democrats talk about safety nets (e. g. Medicaid) and minimum wages. BUT FEW WANT TO HAVE TO USE SAFETY NETS, TO BE ON MEDICAID OR TO WORK FOR MINIMUM WAGE. These policy issues are tough to rally around and those who would benefit the most vote at low rates. (directly, anyway; the economy does benefit from safety net programs). “The poor” is not that big of a voting block and much of the “working class” really isn’t poor.

Yes, there are people who will never grow much past a minimum wage job and Democratic policies might help them, but no one wants to face up to the fact that they are doomed to be stuck on that rung for life.

And so we get critiques of how well the Democrats are doing (and yes, “pathetic” is accurate). Oh, true, we did win the popular vote in 6 of the last 7 Presidential elections (2004 was the exception) but the EC hurt us in 2000 and really hurt us in 2016.

So we try to critique ourselves, and get, well, pathetic articles like this one. Example:

When the poll came out saying that “Democrats stand for nothing more than opposing” Trump, I thought to myself, ‘If only that were true!’” But they can’t even do that well. When House Democratic Caucus chairman Joe Crowley was asked by the Associated Press just what his party’s core message was, he “hesitated” and then said, “That message is being worked on.”

It was as tone deaf (but honest) an answer as when Mother Jones writer Kevin Drum – as sycophantic a representative of the Democratic party in the punditocracy as there is – wrote about how people would have to be “crazy” not to “have a reflective disgust” of people who are homeless and mentally ill.

Considering homeless people are also disproportionately black, LGBT, disabled and, of course, poor, Drum managed to reveal the disdain the liberal elite has of wide swaths of Americans.

Uh, I think the latter is just reality. Most people do have at least an internal “yuck” reaction to many of the homeless and mentally ill.

My response is that we need to use our morals and intellect to work past that “yuck” response ..and to realize that our discomfort might be born from fear that we are just a single (or a few) unlucky incidents from being just like that homeless or mentally ill person.

Example: what if I sustain a head injury that harms my ability to even do math, much less teach and research it? Oh sure, there is enough in the bank to have the home free and clear (and pay taxes) but what about that income? I have disability insurance, but times would get tougher, very quickly.

Nevertheless, articles such as the one I quoted attempt to throw cold water on what I think are needed, frank discussions.

And there is the old “Bernie would have won” bullshit. Yes, I am aware of the polls that showed him beating Trump head to head by bigger margins than Clinton was leading by..but you don’t think that the Trump analytics team would have absolutely vaporized Sanders? Please.

And some are saying he is the 2020 front runner? Oh, spare me. Oh yes, Hillary Clinton is not a great campaigner and I think that she is done, just as Al Gore was in 2000. But Bernie Sanders? Nope.

Oh well, this is why I haven’t written much about politics this year. I consider Trump to be dangerously incompetent and temperamentally unsuited for the job. But I consider my party to be politically incompetent.
In short, the Republicans can win elections but cannot govern; the Democrats can govern but suck at elections.

And yes, I think that the extreme political skill (and policy chops) of Bill Clinton and Barack Obama hid many of our party’s weaknesses. How many of these “purple unicorns” (blessed with show business AND policy skills like Pres. C and Pres. O) do we have?

It is just too depressing right now.

July 24, 2017 Posted by | Democrats, economy, politics, politics/social, republicans, republicans politics, social/political | | Leave a comment

Is there such a thing as a bad workout? (sans a setback)

Ok, of course, it is not good to get injured, or say, take away from an upcoming event by overdoing it prior to the event (e. g. doing 16 x 400 2 days prior to a marathon).

But aside from disasters and silliness…

A friend asked “is there such a thing as a bad workout?”

Answer: “what do you mean by bad?”

Today, it was hot (by Illinois standards) and my walking pace was ridiculous (16:25)

As far as my convoluted course: I started out and noticed a few things:

1. I was hot and sweaty within the first 10 minutes
2. My pace was snail like (16 minutes, when I like to be 15:00 at the Broadway/Columbia Terrace intersection )
3. My legs felt heavy from the get go
4. My bladder was..full..

So when I got to Forrest Hill, I did not turn north on Central but rather continued to Prospect and then into upper Glenn Oak to the tennis court bathroom.

At this point, I said to myself: “survival test”…and decided to take a few selfies and not worry about my time. I kept my time so I could go on a non-standard route and know when to turn home.
So I went through upper Glenn Oak park (yeah, saw a couple of bespandexed cuties), and then decided to take it to the Cemetery.

In the cemetery, I realized it would be a tough sell to ask my body to take the trail to the Tower..and yeah, I was already getting sick of the “weekend cyclists”. (there weren’t that many but..I was grumpy). So I turned left, went over the lower bridge and up the hill, taking right hand turns to add mileage. Then at the top, back to Forrest Hill then right on Central, to Marietta. But on Marietta, I took the bike path to Glenn, then right on Glenn to the Tower.

I had guzzled one bottle, so I did a refill. Oh yes, took my second electrolyte tablet…I will keep taking these. They help.

Then I went down Prospect, right on Marietta and back on Boredom..but I did get to Bootz via Hansler (Sheridan/McClure intersection is under construction).

Then back home. I must have looked terrible; at least one person asked how I was doing and it appeared that one other car stopped to ..check on me? (University student driver). But I felt…well, fine. I was slow as hell though…perhaps my posture was bad.

Now about the question I suppose that a workout is a success if it further advances one’s goals..it can be for pleasure, exercise, or training for an event.
In my case, I’d call it a “bad workout” because I was so blasted slow; that hurts my confidence. But ..I did 5 miles at a 12:20 pace yesterday (walking) and 13.1 at 12:24 last weekend. So I know that I haven’t fallen apart.

I should be experienced enough to know it was just the heat and the wear and tear from last weekend..and two decent workouts in a row.

But…on the other hand, I am a bit of a head case, and I suspect that many of my endurance sports friends are as well..and sometimes we have a workout that is way slower than normal. Today: that was me. But I really am ok..and I do not feel drained, wiped out, etc.

July 23, 2017 Posted by | walking | , | Leave a comment

What’s in store for Illinois Football this year?

Ok, time to speculate on what might happen to Illinois football.

I’ve heard it said that Illinois regressed between 2015 and 2016. I am not so sure.
Yes, Illinois went 5-7 in 2015 and 3-9 in 2016. BUT:
1) the 5-7 record was against a schedule that featured 8 Big Ten games; the 3-9 featured 9 Big Ten games.
In 2015, the Illini went 2-6 (narrow win vs. Nebraska at home, easy win at Purdue); the 2016 version went 2-7, winning easily at Rutgers and narrowly at home vs. Michigan State.

2. As far as the non-conference schedule, in 2015 they had two easy wins vs bad opponents, a blowout loss to North Carolina and a very narrow win vs. Middle Tennessee (missed field goal at the very end). In 2016, the Illini faced North Carolina and a strong Western Michigan team (both blowout losses) and one very bad FCS team (easy win)

3. In 2015, two of the wins were, well very fortunate. As I stated earlier, Middle Tennessee missed a 41 yard field goal at the end and the game against Nebraska: well, let’s just say that Nebraska had the game all but won and had some terrible clock management with about 1:2x to play and Illinois out of time outs. Those could have easily been losses.

On the other hand, Illinois really should have won the Purdue game at home; they made some key mistakes in regulation and in overtime.

So what is in store? Via ESPN

Sat, Sept 2 vs Ball State 68.7% -11.2 (104) —
Sat, Sept 9 vs Western Kentucky 52.0% -5.3 (80) —
Fri, Sept 15 @ South Florida 14.5% 3.9 (47) —
Fri, Sept 29 vs Nebraska 36.4% 1.6 (56) —
Sat, Oct 7 @ Iowa 13.5% 5.4 (40) —
Sat, Oct 14 vs Rutgers 56.2% -7.4 (88) —
Sat, Oct 21 @ Minnesota 25.5% -1.4 (68) —
Sat, Oct 28 vs Wisconsin 6.3% 17.5 (9) —
Sat, Nov 4 @ Purdue 49.0% -9.5 (97) —
Sat, Nov 11 vs Indiana 33.2% 1.0 (59) —
Sat, Nov 18 @ Ohio State 0.8% 29.1 (1) —
Sat, Nov 25 vs Northwestern 16.3% 8.8 (29)

What this means: Illinois is favored in 3 games (Ball State, Western Kentucky, Rutgers), and almost even vs. Purdue.
Best chances for upsets: Nebraska and Indiana at home, Minnesota on the road.

My take:

1) Western Kentucky is underrated. They split with Louisiana Tech last year; I really do not see the Illini winning this game.
2) As far as Illinois vs Purdue: the visiting team has won the last 5 games. Maybe we will see a 6’th?

I can really take nothing for granted; not even Ball State (though the Illini really should win that game).

My best guess:
6-6 if everything goes right (wins over Ball State, Rutgers, Purdue, the 3 of (WKU, Neb, MN, IN, NW)
2-10 if everything goes wrong (Ball State, Rutgers)

Realistically: 4-8 (a lot like Beckman’s 2’nd team), with wins over Ball State, Rutgers, Purdue, and ONE of (WKU, Neb, MN, IN, NW) This closely aligns with the above ESPN model, that has Illinois winning 3.7 games.

The bottom line is that the Illini lost almost all of their best players from last year, save the star wide receiver who hurt his knee the last two years in a row; will be the same?

Most of the magazines are saying 2-10 to 3-9.

Fan note: the fact that I made up a spreadsheet of Illinois games (season tickets), Illinois State games (maybe 3?), Colts games (maybe 2?) and Bears games (1-2?) means nothing. 🙂

Workout notes: 5 treadmill miles in 1:02:15 (walking); thunderstorms outside.

July 22, 2017 Posted by | college football, football, walking | | Leave a comment

Why do people lie about dumb stuff?

Yes, I can understand (but do not approve of) lying for gain and maybe even lying to not hurt someone’s feelings (in subjective matters…say, giving a sympathy “like” to someone’s …let’s just say, less than attractive selfie or “less than impressive but they appear to be proud of it” performance. No…I am not one who does this…ok, I might do this on very rare occasion but rarely with someone I consider to be a friend.

But why lie about..say, a time you ran, a weight you lifted, a team you claim to have played for, etc.? After all, someone who knows enough to be genuinely impressed will know that you are full of crap, and others..well, why seek approval from someone who doesn’t know the area?

Sometimes I wonder if it a sort of test..to see if you’ll attempt to “one up them”, in which case, they’ll know that you are a liar. It might be a way of sizing you up.

How I handle it: with someone I don’t know, I might say “wow…I’ve never even been close to that..here is what I’ve done…” and give them an honest accounting of what I’ve done.

It is amazing how many “400 lb. bench pressers“, “12-13 minutes per mile walkers”, former “NCAA/NFL” players there are out there. (*)

Workout notes:

Weights, rope skips, 2 mile run, goblet squats:

weights: rotator cuff, hip hikes, toe raises, pull ups (5 sets of 10, good), bench: 10 x 135, 4 x 190, 8 x 170, incline: 10 x 140, military: 15 x 55 dumbbell, (seated, supported), 10 x 45 standing, 20 x 40 standing, rows: 2 sets of 10 x 55 dumbbell (each arm), 10 x 110 machine.

2 mile treadmill run: 10:35 mile 1, 8:35 mile 2, 2.1 in 20:00
rope skips: 29, 34, 37 to get to 100. I am spastic….just awful.
goblet squats: 10 x 44 (to 24 inches), 5 x 60 (lower bench), 10 x 62 (24 inches), 5 x 60 (lower bench)

(*) And if you must know: I boxed in college PE class (made an 86 on my final), flamed out in high school sports, (football, wrestling) ran a 5:30 mile, bench pressed 310 (at 230 lbs. bodyweight; current best is 200 at 195 lbs. bodyweight, 57 years of age), 3:33 marathon (lifetime, 1980, 3:38 masters, 2000), 1:34 half marathon (1999, 40 years old), 18:57 5K (1982, 20:37 at 40), 39:50 10k (1982, masters best is 42:27 in 1999) 101 miles of walking in 24 hours (2004), 4:44 powerwalk marathon (2002, not judged), 2:17 half marathon powerwalk (monitored), judged racewalks: 8:31 1500, 18:03 3000, 30:42 5K, 2:27 20K, all between 42-43 years of age.

Swim: 1:36 5K swim (2008 Big Shoulders) , 15:36 1000 (my own), 15:59 official meet.

July 21, 2017 Posted by | running, social/political, weight training | , | Leave a comment

Resentments, public policy and politics

Kathleen Parker wrote an interesting column about the Republican attempts to repeal the ACA and to replace. Yes, I know; this is more or less a Republican plan to begin with which is built around the three pillars of “community rating, mandate, and subsidies

The community rating means that high risk people get charged the same as low risk people. So here, the strong subsidize the weak. The mandate means that everyone has to get in, not just the sick who need it right now. So the healthy subsidize the sick.

Then subsidies means the financially strong subsidize the financially weak.

And yes, this can lead to resentment. We all seem to know (or even have in our family) some worthless goof off or person who engages in risky behavior (smoking, overeating, drugging, being lazy, drinking to excess) or the irresponsible who either mooches or blows all of their money and then expects others to keep them afloat.

So there is no denying that losers will be helped by the responsible:

Many Americans simply don’t see the fairness in a system that requires them to pay high premiums for others’ poor health, some of which is, let’s face it, earned. Not deserved, but sometimes resulting from poor lifestyle choices. Why, indeed, should a single, childless 30-year-old male who runs three miles a day, eats rationally, and doesn’t drink, smoke or take drugs be saddled with insurance premiums to cover pregnancy, abortion, alcoholism, addiction, or an abundance of health consequences resulting from obesity and inertia?

For that matter, why should women have to subsidize men’s sexual- dysfunction curatives when, by the way, men don’t have to pony up for women’s corresponding, post-menopausal, medically appropriate intercessions? Here you see one of the finer-print dilemmas. We’d rather force nuns to concede tacit approval of abortion than insist that insurance subsidies be tied to healthy behaviors.

I’m sorry if this sounds heartless; the brain calls it reality. No wonder Obamacare was so difficult to craft and a replacement equally so. There are simply too many moving parts to make the sucker float — and too many reasons not to sink it.

Since McConnell’s repeal-only idea seemed doomed Tuesday afternoon after GOP Sens. Collins, Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.) and Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) said they oppose immediate repeal, perhaps, finally, Republicans and Democrats can snap on their wizard hats and cobble something workable together. After all, it’s the only thing they haven’t tried yet.

On the other hand:

1. Most of us know, at least on some level, that we are just a disaster away from needing help ourselves. We have weather, accidents, bad genetics, untimely diseases, etc. I have had several responsible, physically fit friends die early due to cancer. One can really “do everything right” and get horribly unlucky.

2. The economy: taking away health insurance and/or Medicaid will lead to move poverty, more people going bankrupt and damage our economy. Businesses need customers to stay in business.

So, I think the right thing to do is to bite the bullet and live with some slackers getting help that they really don’t “deserve”; overall, all of us are better off.

Now when it comes to discussing the issues of the day, Trump is so hated that some of my friends will not even talk to a Trump supporter. My big beef with Trump is that he is a rank amateur who doesn’t know what he is doing.

Oh well…yes, I am friends with some Republicans and I even regularly socialize with one.

Workout notes: disgustingly humid outside (and rainy) so I took indoor for 6 miles: 1 warm up on the treadmill, 32 laps in lane 2 in 49:47, doing “2 laps on, 2 laps off”:
12:55, 12:37, 12:12, 12:01, then a 13:47 “1 minute froggy” cool down mile (raised either incline, or speed every minute).

July 21, 2017 Posted by | politics, politics/social, social/political, walking | Leave a comment

Gap in my proposed proof…

I’ve been thinking hard about a result and finally found a gap in my proposed proof….what I’ve done so far is correct, but it does not “finish the job”. I think that I can take it home though. The extra complexity means that it will be a better result, I think. But I must be careful.

Yes, I’ve been following the political circus that comes with electing an inexperienced amateur as POTUS. Goodness.

Workout notes from yesterday:

weights plus an easy 4 mile walk in the morning; Ms. Vickie’s exercise class with Jennifer in the evening.
Morning: the walk wasn’t much; just a park course.
weights: rotator cuff, hip hikes, 5 sets of 10 pull ups, incline presses: 10 x 135, 5 x 160 (slight hip movement on the final rep), 7 x 150 (good hips), military: 15 x 55 seated, supported (dumbbell), 10 x 45 standing, 20 x 40 standing, Hammer machine rows: 3 sets of 10 x 200.

I also did some rope skips: exhausting. I need to do more of these. I managed 10 with out a miss, then 20. I’d like to work up to a set of 100, but that will take time. I am totally spastic right now.

July 20, 2017 Posted by | politics, walking, weight training | | Leave a comment

Why Republicans can’t repeal the ACA…

Bottom line: the ACA IS A REPUBLICAN IDEA. Yes, the statement is rated as “half true” but:

Republican Sen. John Chafee of Rhode Island was the point man. The bill he introduced, Health Equity and Access Reform Today, (yes, that spells HEART) had a list of 20 co-sponsors that was a who’s who of Republican leadership. There was Minority Leader Bob Dole, R- Kan., Sens. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, Richard Lugar, R-Ind., and many others. There also were two Democratic co-sponsors.

Among other features, the Chafee bill included:

An individual mandate;

Creation of purchasing pools;

Standardized benefits;

Vouchers for the poor to buy insurance;

A ban on denying coverage based on a pre-existing condition.

“You would find a great deal of similarity to provisions in the Affordable Care Act,” Sheila Burke, Dole’s chief of staff in 1993, told PunditFact via email. “The guys were way ahead of the times!! Different crowd, different time, suffice it to say.”

That said, the Senate plan from 1993 was not identical to the health care law that passed in 2010. The Republican bill did not expand Medicaid as Obamacare does, and it did have medical malpractice tort reform, which the current law does not. In contrast to the current employer mandate, the Chafee bill required employers to offer insurance, but they were under no obligation to help pay for it.

So, it did have a great deal in common with the Heritage Foundation plan. And, as Paul Krugman points out, all three pillars: mandate, community ratings, subsidies, are necessary.

Workout notes: 41:55 for 4 treadmill miles: 5 minute froggy for the first 20 minutes, 2.5 minute froggy for the next 22. 11:45, 22:10, 32:25 or 30:10 for the final 3..about 1 minute slower than my last 2 5K “races”.

July 19, 2017 Posted by | health care, politics/social, running | Leave a comment

Why record keeping helps me…

I have my “marathon and beyond” list here.

Here, I am going to list my walking half marathons (and one 30K) Why? It makes a point: (note: I rarely walked this distance in the first few years of walking; I was more into the marathons and ultras, though I did do this distance frequently as a runner)

September 2003: 2:17 (Appleton Fox-Cities powerwalk division)
January 2008: Austin 30K 3:50:56 (about 2:40 for the half marathon split)
September 2008: 2:25:13 Quad Cities
September 2010: 2:39:13 Quad Cities (surgery that summer)
September 2011: 2:40:53 IVS
September 2011: 2:22 Quad Cities
January 2012: 2:34 First Light
June 2012: 2:30:18 Galesburg
September 2012: 2:24:46 IVS
April 2014: 2:25:26 Peoria Heights
May 2014: 2:19:15 Peoria
September 2014 2:35 (IVS)
September 2014 2:24:17 Quad Cities
September 2015 2:38:13 IVS
June 2017: 2:47:24 Galesburg
July 2017 2:42:19 Chicago RR

One thing to remember about my sub 2:30 half marathon powerwalks: they were almost ALL done in cooler weather. So when one takes age into account, my last two warm weather results do not look that bad.

July 18, 2017 Posted by | walking | , , | Leave a comment

Chiefs matinee: beat TinCaps 2-1 in 12

If you like pitchers duels, this was your game. The starters controlled things; both went 7 innings and allowed 2 hits and 1 run each; the TinCaps starter struck out 8. He fired 95 mile and hour fastballs, but the Chiefs left fielder got a homerun. The TinCaps run came on a bizarre play; they got an extra base hit with a man on base who tripped coming around 3’rd. But the runner kept going and so you had 2 runners on 3’rd..the Chiefs tried to get one or both runners in a run down but got neither.

Bot teams stranded 2 base runners in the extra innings; it took 12.


opening pitch

12’th inning: most of the remaining fans were in the shade.

Winning: tell me the pros don’t care about winning.

Workout notes: I walked to and from the game (just over 3 miles total) and lifted weights:

hip hikes, rotator cuff, calf raises.
goblet squats: sets of 5: 25, 45, 50, 50, 60, 70 (good depth)
pull ups: 5 sets of 10
bench press: 10 x 135, 4 x 185, 8 x 170 (low energy)
incline press: 10 x 135
military: 20 x 50 dumbbell seated, supported, 20 x 40 standing, 10 x 90 machine
rows: 2 sets of 10 x 50, 10 x 110 machine
abs: 2 sets of 12 twist crunch, 10 leg lifts, legs up the wall, moving bridge, head stand (on a harder surface)
Whole weight routine was “low energy”.

July 18, 2017 Posted by | baseball, walking, weight training | | Leave a comment

Chicago Rock and Roll Half: acceptance

It wasn’t hot, but it was humid.

Splits:

11:00, 11:28, 11:34, 11:33, 12:16 (57:53), 12:38, 12:24, 12:40 (1:35:36), 12:53, 12:42 (2:01:12), 13:07, 13:29, 14:40 (2:42:29) (13:20 last mile).

You can see what the issue was: I started out too fast. My final 5K was pretty awful though I didn’t look that bad; I might have had more oomph toward the end with a more reasonable start. I’ll have to work on that.

In terms of age grading: this was similar to the walk I did in 2011 (Mobile, Alabama)

I started in Corral 16 which meant that my wave left about 31 minutes after the start. There was very little crowding early; that was a very good thing. Yes, eyestrain..lots of very tight, pretty spandex to chase. And perhaps I chased too much of it early. Somewhere around 4-5 miles (I was taking s-caps every 3-4 miles or so) I realized that my pace was unsustainable; after a sort of bad mile 6 (see the photo), I recovered somewhat and just walked.

Notes:

1. We did have a brief stop to let an emergency vehicle through.
2. There were several signs held by spectators: one said “free motivational butt slaps” (lol); the other said “you smell great”. I bellowed: “I don’t think so” and people chuckled.
3. I liked the course; in the last 2 miles or so we went past McCormick and Soldier Field and the Museum campus.
4. At about 11.5 a racewalker passed me. She told me that I had inspired her for “13 miles”. Her form looked great..and oh, what a cute rear end in shiny spandex. But alas; I tried to go after her and could not reel her in.
5. Event was well organized; I can recommend it. The lodging is pricey but the event was fine.

I did have some longing for days past when my body worked better, but I had the health and the means to do this race, and that is something to be grateful for; something to savor.

But I do have to face reality: a good marathon pace for me would be 13-13:20 or so. I need to practice walking at that pace.

Photos:


The pre race ritual…


View from my corral.

The start line is in the distance! 6 more minutes!

Ankle inflammation kept Barbara from doing the 10K. But she was a good sport and cheered me on. Here I am at mile 6; kind of rough sledding (perhaps breaking form for a water stop?)

These next 3 show me between 12 and 13; my form is MUCH better here (even legal) though I was focused on “walking as well as I could” as I knew my time was not going to be a fast one.

July 17, 2017 Posted by | travel, walking | , , , | 2 Comments